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Large Station Board;
Entry# 412674-0

MYGL/Miyagam Karjan Junction NG (3 PFs)
મિયાગામ કરજણ જંકશન નેરોગેજ     मियागाम करजन जंक्शन नेरॉगेज

Track: Narrow Gauge

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Nava Bazar, Karjan
State: Gujarat


Zone: WR/Western   Division: Vadodara

No Recent News for MYGL/Miyagam Karjan Junction NG
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Type of Station: Junction
Number of Platforms: 3
Number of Halting Trains: 0
Number of Originating Trains: 4
Number of Terminating Trains: 4
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Station News

Page#    Showing 1 to 4 of 4 News Items  
Jul 16 2018 (20:39) 33-km long Dabhoi-Miyagam Narrow Gauge line closed for Gauge Conversion – heritage status ruled out! (www.railnews.in)
IR Affairs
WR/Western
0 Followers
21330 views

News Entry# 346181  Blog Entry# 3635207   
  Past Edits
Jul 16 2018 (20:39)
Station Tag: Miyagam Karjan Junction NG/MYGL added by sreerup kol^~/1802590

Jul 16 2018 (20:39)
Station Tag: Dabhoi Junction/DB added by sreerup kol^~/1802590
RailNews Media India Ltd
railnews.in

VADODARA: India’s oldest working narrow gauge line will now remain only in history books. The 33-km long Dabhoi-Miyagam line, which has the distinction of being the first narrow gauge section in the country since 1862, will be closed forever from Sunday. The line will be converted into broad gauge soon.
The
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last pair of trains between Dabhoi and Miyagam as train numbers 52019/ 52020 chugged on the narrow gauge section on Saturday evening.
Ironically, just last month, the ministry of railways (Railway Board) had identified the Dabhoi-Miyagam line as one of the five narrow gauge lines that can be preserved for promoting heritage tourism in the country. For this, it had asked the Western Railway (WR) to submit its opinion by June 30.
The Railway Board’s letter to WR last month had raised hopes that the narrow gauge line will be saved from extinction. as In 2004-05 a survey on whether Dabhoi-Miyagam line should be converted into broad gauge was undertaken, but there was no development after that.
We received a communique from our headquarters on Friday that the ministry of railways has decided to permanently discontinue the narrow gauge trains running between Dabhoi and Miyagam to pursue broad gauge conversion, an official of Vadodara railway division said. However, Vadodara railway officials were tight-lipped over the latest order from the ministry. Sources said even they were baffled by the two contradictory orders of the same ministry.
Apart from Dabhoi-Miyagam line, four other narrow gauge lines that the ministry had identified for promoting heritage tourism included the Miyagam-Malsar line, the Charonda-Moti Koral line, the Pratapnagar-Jambusar line and the Bilimora-Waghi line. Except the Bilimora-Waghi line that falls in the Mumbai Central division, all four other lines that date back to the Gaekwad era fall in Vadodara railway division. All four narrow gauge lines were originally owned by the erstwhile Gaekwad Baroda State Railway, which post-Independence merged with the Indian Railways’ network.

17339 views
Jul 23 2018 (18:39)
riz339
riz339~   4345 blog posts
Re# 3635207-1            Tags   Past Edits
#admin pl update map as section close for #gc

16618 views
Jul 23 2018 (18:42)
Yash M^~   56837 blog posts
Re# 3635207-2            Tags   Past Edits
Updated

16250 views
Jul 23 2018 (19:48)
ApsaraRaniGhoshPal27
WorldWar3~   6427 blog posts
Re# 3635207-3            Tags   Past Edits
good decision, at last Dabhoi-Mumbai trains can run
Jun 20 2018 (10:33) 5 Narrow Gauge Rail lines in Gujarat to be preserved for Tourism (www.railnews.in)
Tourism
WR/Western
0 Followers
46962 views

News Entry# 342014  Blog Entry# 3552417   
  Past Edits
Jun 20 2018 (10:34)
Station Tag: Waghai/WGI added by sreerup kol/1802590

Jun 20 2018 (10:34)
Station Tag: Bilimora Junction/BIM added by sreerup kol/1802590

Jun 20 2018 (10:34)
Station Tag: Jambusar Junction/JMB added by sreerup kol/1802590

Jun 20 2018 (10:34)
Station Tag: Pratapnagar/PRTN added by sreerup kol/1802590

Jun 20 2018 (10:33)
Station Tag: Charodiya/CHRD added by sreerup kol/1802590

Jun 20 2018 (10:33)
Station Tag: Moti Koral/MKRL added by sreerup kol/1802590

Jun 20 2018 (10:33)
Station Tag: Malsar/MLSR added by sreerup kol/1802590

Jun 20 2018 (10:33)
Station Tag: Miyagam Karjan Junction NG/MYGL added by sreerup kol/1802590

Jun 20 2018 (10:33)
Station Tag: Dabhoi Junction/DB added by sreerup kol/1802590
RailNews Media India Ltd
railnews.in

VADODARA: The Railway Ministry has decided to preserve five narrow gauge rail lines in Gujarat, built by the erstwhile princely state of Baroda, an official said today.
The five
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railway lines, which are collectively 204-kms long, were originally owned by the princely state’s Gaekwad Baroda State Railway (GBSR), but are currently operated by the Western Railway (WR).
The Railway Board has recently written a letter to the WR informing it that a decision has been taken to preserve the five narrow gauge lines to promote tourism in the state, the official said.
“These five old, but working rail lines date back to the 19th century. One of these lines, Dabhoi-Miyagam line, which is 33-kms long was the nation’s first narrow gauge line. In 1862, it started functioning when coaches were pulled by oxen. Steam engines came a year later,” Subrata Nath, Executive Director (Heritage) of the Railway Board, told PTI today.
“The owner of the GBSR, Sayajirao Gaekwad III, the Maharaja of Baroda, had developed this network of railways, linking many towns across his state. The jurisdiction of his state extended up to Amreli-Junagadh in Saurashtra, Mehsana in North Gujarat and Bilimora in South Gujarat,” he added.
Apart from the Dabhoi-Miyagam line, the other four narrow gauge lines that are planned to be preserved are: 38-km long Miyagam-Malsar line, 19-km long Charonda-Moti Karal line, 51-km long Pratap Nagar-Jambusar line and 63-km long Bilmora-Waghi line.
Incidentally, another arm of the railway network, from the Dabhoi section to Chandod, is part of the gauge conversion project to link to the Gujarat government’s proposed Statue of Unity. The historic passenger train running between Dabhoi and Chandod railway stations in the district made its final run last month to make way for the conversion of narrow gauge line into broad gauge.
“The old narrow gauge lines are part of Asia’s largest narrow-gauge light railway system. At present, commercially working narrow gauge lines have almost become non-existent in the world, except for some hill railways in India,” Nath said.
Elaborating on the letter, he said, “The Railway Board has asked the WR to prepare a detailed plan identifying the resources required to preserve these lines and also to develop them for promoting heritage railway tourism.”
The WR has been asked to send its report to the board by June 30, he added.
According to the official, these five narrow gauge lines in Gujarat are more or less “island lines” as they connect far-flung areas, and gauge conversion will not significantly add to the connectivity value for the local population.
In India, the narrow gauge lines are 2 feet 6 inches apart, while the broad gauge lines are 5 ft 6 inches apart. Therefore, engines, coaches, machinery and maintenance apparatus required for the narrow gauge network are different from the rest of broad gauge network.
Jun 17 2018 (18:18) Running since 19th Century, five narrow gauge rail lines to stay (indianexpress.com)
0 Followers
13094 views

News Entry# 341666  Blog Entry# 3542851   
  Past Edits
Jun 17 2018 (18:18)
Station Tag: Miyagam Karjan Junction NG/MYGL added by Prakhar Yadav*^~/622971

Jun 17 2018 (18:18)
Station Tag: Dabhoi Junction/DB added by Prakhar Yadav*^~/622971
In narrow gauge in India, the rails are 2 feet, 6 inches apart, requiring engines, coaches, machinery and maintenance apparatus that are different from the rest of the broad gauge network, whose rails are 5 ft, 6 inches apart.
Making a big exception in its gauge conversion policy, the Indian Railways has decided to preserve the five oldest, working narrow gauge lines dating back to its colonial era, part of what was Asia’s largest narrow-gauge light railway system, running since the 19th Century.
Commercially working narrow gauge lines are pretty much non-existent in
...
more...
the world, other than some hill railways in India, and this is an effort by the Railways to save them from complete extinction. All the lines are in Gujarat, totalling 204 km, and were originally owned by the princely state’s Gaekwad Baroda State Railway (GBSR).
A letter that the five narrow gauge lines would be preserved was issued on Thursday. Around two-three pairs of trains (up and down) operate on these lines every day, with marginal footfalls.
One of the sections, the 33-km Dabhoi-Miyagam line, was India’s first narrow gauge railway stretch. It started operations in 1862, when coaches were pulled by oxen, before steam engines were deployed the following year. The Maharaja of Baroda, the owner of GBSR, subsequently built a network of light railways, connecting most towns in his state. Dabhoi remained the centre of the narrow gauge network. Later a workshop was also built at Pratap Nagar near Baroda.
Policymakers at the Railway Ministry have been keen to preserve this key industrial heritage. A ground assessment of the ministry shows it draws many foreign tourists every year.
Apart from the Dabhoi-Miyagam lines, the other lines are Miyagam-Malsar (38 km), Charonda-Moti Karal (19 km), Pratap Nagar-Jambusar (51 km) and Bilmora-Waghi (63 km).
Incidentally, another arm of the railway network, from the Dabhoi section to Chandod, is part of the gauge conversion project to link to the Gujarat government’s proposed Statue of Unity. Policymakers said the project will not be affected by the new conservation decision.
However, the ministry may have to alter a few related gauge-conversion projects sanctioned in the past, before this policy change. The erstwhile Gwalior Light Railway in Madhya Pradesh, another piece of narrow gauge heritage from the era of the princely states, has already been marked for gauge conversion following years of sustained pressure from local politicians.
The decision to preserve GBSR was taken by Railway Board Chairman Ashwani Lohani, along with the Financial Commissioner and Member (Engineering) of the Board. Western Railway, in whose jurisdiction the lines fall, has been asked to make a detailed plan ascertaining the resources required to not just preserve the lines but to develop them for promoting heritage railway tourism.
Sources said that at the meeting it was pointed out that past decisions regarding conversion of many of the narrow gauge lines in Gujarat were taken not because of operational needs of the Railways but due to local political pressure.
Currently, gauge conversion is happening on lines that have been defunct for 15-20 years — unlike the five identified for preservation. These five lines, connecting far-flung areas of Gujarat, are more or less “island lines”, and gauge conversion will not significantly add to the connectivity value for the local population, according to officials.
In narrow gauge in India, the rails are 2 feet, 6 inches apart, requiring engines, coaches, machinery and maintenance apparatus that are different from the rest of the broad gauge network, whose rails are 5 ft, 6 inches apart.
“Firstly these are island lines, preserving them will not adversely affect the rest of the network, and secondly, it appears that gauge conversion and electrification of these lines will not be financially viable, whereas preserving them will be invaluable,” said Sanjoy Mookerjee, former financial commissioner of Indian Railways and a mentor of the Railway Ministry’s Heritage Conservation Committee, headed by the Railway Board Chairman.
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Jun 17 2018 (18:18) Running since 19th Century, five narrow gauge rail lines to stay (indianexpress.com)
0 Followers
13151 views

News Entry# 341665  Blog Entry# 3542850   
  Past Edits
Jun 17 2018 (18:18)
Station Tag: Miyagam Karjan Junction NG/MYGL added by Prakhar Yadav*^~/622971

Jun 17 2018 (18:18)
Station Tag: Dabhoi Junction/DB added by Prakhar Yadav*^~/622971
In narrow gauge in India, the rails are 2 feet, 6 inches apart, requiring engines, coaches, machinery and maintenance apparatus that are different from the rest of the broad gauge network, whose rails are 5 ft, 6 inches apart.
Making a big exception in its gauge conversion policy, the Indian Railways has decided to preserve the five oldest, working narrow gauge lines dating back to its colonial era, part of what was Asia’s largest narrow-gauge light railway system, running since the 19th Century.
Commercially working narrow gauge lines are pretty much non-existent in
...
more...
the world, other than some hill railways in India, and this is an effort by the Railways to save them from complete extinction. All the lines are in Gujarat, totalling 204 km, and were originally owned by the princely state’s Gaekwad Baroda State Railway (GBSR).
A letter that the five narrow gauge lines would be preserved was issued on Thursday. Around two-three pairs of trains (up and down) operate on these lines every day, with marginal footfalls.
One of the sections, the 33-km Dabhoi-Miyagam line, was India’s first narrow gauge railway stretch. It started operations in 1862, when coaches were pulled by oxen, before steam engines were deployed the following year. The Maharaja of Baroda, the owner of GBSR, subsequently built a network of light railways, connecting most towns in his state. Dabhoi remained the centre of the narrow gauge network. Later a workshop was also built at Pratap Nagar near Baroda.
Policymakers at the Railway Ministry have been keen to preserve this key industrial heritage. A ground assessment of the ministry shows it draws many foreign tourists every year.
Apart from the Dabhoi-Miyagam lines, the other lines are Miyagam-Malsar (38 km), Charonda-Moti Karal (19 km), Pratap Nagar-Jambusar (51 km) and Bilmora-Waghi (63 km).
Incidentally, another arm of the railway network, from the Dabhoi section to Chandod, is part of the gauge conversion project to link to the Gujarat government’s proposed Statue of Unity. Policymakers said the project will not be affected by the new conservation decision.
However, the ministry may have to alter a few related gauge-conversion projects sanctioned in the past, before this policy change. The erstwhile Gwalior Light Railway in Madhya Pradesh, another piece of narrow gauge heritage from the era of the princely states, has already been marked for gauge conversion following years of sustained pressure from local politicians.
The decision to preserve GBSR was taken by Railway Board Chairman Ashwani Lohani, along with the Financial Commissioner and Member (Engineering) of the Board. Western Railway, in whose jurisdiction the lines fall, has been asked to make a detailed plan ascertaining the resources required to not just preserve the lines but to develop them for promoting heritage railway tourism.
Sources said that at the meeting it was pointed out that past decisions regarding conversion of many of the narrow gauge lines in Gujarat were taken not because of operational needs of the Railways but due to local political pressure.
Currently, gauge conversion is happening on lines that have been defunct for 15-20 years — unlike the five identified for preservation. These five lines, connecting far-flung areas of Gujarat, are more or less “island lines”, and gauge conversion will not significantly add to the connectivity value for the local population, according to officials.
In narrow gauge in India, the rails are 2 feet, 6 inches apart, requiring engines, coaches, machinery and maintenance apparatus that are different from the rest of the broad gauge network, whose rails are 5 ft, 6 inches apart.
“Firstly these are island lines, preserving them will not adversely affect the rest of the network, and secondly, it appears that gauge conversion and electrification of these lines will not be financially viable, whereas preserving them will be invaluable,” said Sanjoy Mookerjee, former financial commissioner of Indian Railways and a mentor of the Railway Ministry’s Heritage Conservation Committee, headed by the Railway Board Chairman.
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DDCA election: Madan Lal gets backing of 1983 World Cup heroes
Page#    Showing 1 to 4 of 4 News Items  

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